Elizabeth Stolfi
staff writer
January 17, 2004
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Stop All the World Now Stop All the World Now
November 16, 2004
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Rock Music Reviews
Howie Day
Stop All the World Now

After the unexpected success of his debut LP, Australia, Howie Day’s new album Stop All The World Now is a start of a new chapter for this young singer/songwriter. Alternative radio has been spinning “Perfect Time of Day,” the album’s strongest commercial track. Stop All The World Now is a touch of U2, and well, a touch of more U2. In the style of insightful European rock, Howie Day has perfected the whole “I’m so hurt,” without all that pesky emo wrapping.

From beginning to end, the album is a big collection of lyrics that seem excited, but are really depressed. While his first album Australia is mostly light acoustic tracks and “tomorrow will be better” type lyrics, this album takes a totally different approach. The album’s first track, “Brace Yourself,” explodes with guitars and Bono belches and moans. “Brace yourself/with all that you have,” is sung in a way that will interest anyone.

The Sunday Bloody Sunday doesn’t stop there. If “You & A Promise,” one of the album highlights, were on Joshua Tree I wouldn’t blink an eye. It’s ok though. Howie definitely has a style of his own, and every other track on the album proves it. “End of Our Days” is definitely the strongest track on the album, and perhaps the best song he’s released yet. A piano ballad of the classic kind, the lyrics and music are nothing short of brilliant. “Here where they can’t find us/I dare them to call us out.” It’s simple, but makes it’s impact.

Overall, It’s by far his best release yet. You normally wouldn’t expect something so good from a 22 year old spiky haired guy from Maine, but Howie Day is definitely an exception.

Release date: November 16, 2004
Label: Sony
Rating: 8.0 / 10

[RMR]